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Other Topics - Can the OCC Help?


Can the OCC check my Social Security number for fraudulent activity?

No. The OCC does not maintain or dispense credit information. If you have concerns, you should obtain a copy of your credit report.

You are entitled to one free annual credit report every 12 months from each of the three major credit bureaus—Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion. AnnualCreditReport.com, which was created by the three credit bureaus, is a centralized service for requesting your free annual credit reports. You can order all three credit reports at the same time, or order one now and others later.

AnnualCreditReport.com enables you to request, view, and print your credit report in a secure Internet environment. Or you can have your report mailed to you.

Here are the Web links and phone numbers for the three major credit bureaus:

Can the OCC help me find out if a bank has been cited for a violation of a regulation or law?

According to Federal law, results of examinations are considered confidential. The OCC cannot release any information relating to any supervisory actions or regarding whether a violation of law or regulation occurred in connection with your complaint.

However, you can look for two kinds of information on the Web site, www.occ.gov:

Can the OCC provide a list of reputable mortgage lenders?

No. We suggest that you ask friends or business associates if they were satisfied with their lenders.

Can the OCC help me find a particular national bank?

Yes. Please contact the OCC's Customer Assistance Group at 1-800-613-6743 or via e-mail at customer.assistance@occ.treas.gov. Or you can use any Internet search engine to find a bank and its Web site. (Bank phone numbers are generally located in the Contact or Customer Service section of the bank's site.)

Can the OCC give me a bank's phone number?

Yes. Please contact the OCC's Customer Assistance Group at 1-800-613-6743 or via e-mail at customer.assistance@occ.treas.gov. An alternative is to use any Internet search engine to find a bank and its Web site. (Bank phone numbers are generally located in the Contact or Customer Service section of the bank's site.)

Can the OCC give me where a bank's main office is located?

Yes. Please contact the OCC’s Customer Assistance Group at 1-800-613-6743 or via e-mail at customer.assistance@occ.treas.gov. An alternative is to use any Internet search engine to find a bank and its Web site. (Bank phone numbers are generally located in the Contact or Customer Service section of the bank's site.)

Where can I find the names of the board members/officers of the bank?

One way to find this information is to use an Internet search engine to find the bank and its Web site. Information about board members and officers can generally be found in the Investor Relations section of the site.

You can also ask the bank for a copy of its annual report, or check your local library for a copy of one of the major bank directories.

Can I purchase coins from the OCC?

No. The OCC is a Federal regulatory agency that regulates national banks.

Contact your bank directly. Or you could contact a local coin dealer.

For collector coins, contact the United States Mint at 1-800-872-6468.

Can I purchase T-bills from the OCC?

No. The OCC is a Federal regulatory agency that regulates national banks.

Contact the Bureau of Public Debt (Treasury Direct) at 1-800-722-2678.

Can the OCC help me establish the value of coins or currency?

No. The OCC is a Federal regulatory agency that regulates national banks.

Contact a local coin dealer for this information.

If I file a complaint with the OCC, will that stop the collection process or any legal action initiated by a bank?

No. Generally the OCC does not have the authority to stop any collection process or legal action taken by a bank.

Where can I find information on an OCC news story or press release?

Go to the OCC Web site.

How can I get a copy of the OCC's congressional testimonies and press releases?

Go to the OCC Web site.

My issue with the bank is currently in litigation. Can the OCC help me?

Generally, no. The OCC examines national banks to ensure their compliance with specific statutes within their delegated authority. The OCC cannot intervene in matters that are in or pending litigation, or that have been litigated.

The OCC is not authorized to review the merits of the judicial decision.

I am a bank employee who is having trouble in my workplace. Can the OCC help?

No. The OCC is a Federal regulatory agency that regulates national banks. The OCC cannot help with this type of problem.

Contact the Department of Labor at 1-866-487-2365 or visit its National Call Center page.

Can the OCC help me find an attorney?

No. The OCC is a Federal regulatory agency that regulates national banks. The OCC does not have information on attorneys.

You may want to ask your friends or business associates for a recommendation.

Can the OCC help me solve a problem with a State-chartered bank?

If you have a complaint about a State-chartered bank, please contact the relevant State attorney general or State banking department.

Links to State attorneys general can be found on the Web site of the National Association of Attorneys General.

The Conference of State Bank Supervisors lists State banking department links.

Can the OCC tell me who acquired my bank?

Contact the OCC Customer Assistance Group at 1-800-613-6743.

How can I find out about enforcement actions that have been taken against a national bank?

Visit the Enforcement Actions page on the OCC Web site to learn more.

How safe is a particular bank?
What is the rating for a particular bank?

Generally, the OCC cannot give out information about specific banks. But the national banking system is safe and sound, with customer deposits insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC).

The FDIC Web site provides information that can determine the condition of a bank:

What is the status of my bank?

Generally, the OCC cannot give out information about specific banks. But the national banking system is safe and sound, with customer deposits insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC).

The FDIC Web site provides information that can determine the condition of a bank:







Copyright 2007 by Mark McCracken , All Rights Reserved